10.03.2009

Zhou Tian

Zhou Tian (b. 1981)


Hello Commission Club members!



One week from today we will be hearing our first premiere!  The final preparations are being made for the Balcony Bash.  Stay tuned.


Here is Zhou's submission to the club regarding A Thousand Years of Good Prayers:


Symphonic Poem
A Thousand Years of Good Prayers (2009)

Duration: ca. 9 Minutes.

A Thousand Years of Good Prayers is a nine-minute piece for full orchestra completed in the fall of 2009. A Thousand Years of Good Prayers, or Qian Nian Jing Qi, is an old Chinese saying regarding family relationships. It basically means that it takes a thousand years of good prayers to pray for a good relationship in the family, whether between parents or between parents and children. For years this was just a really old saying to me, until I started having difficult times with my father recently. Then I thought about this again and finally realized its true meaning - that we should not only appreciate a good relationship, but really appreciate the existence of that relationship, the chance that we can be together as a family. In reality we all have frustrations and complications in the relationships we have, but what's important is that as long as we appreciate it with respect and understanding, it is then a good relationship. It is then worth a thousand years of good prayers. My personal experience inspired me to write this piece, which I see as a work to celebrate the ideas behind this old saying. It might be old, but it's never been truer today.

A Thousand Years of Good Prayers was commissioned by The Green Bay Commission Club for the Green Bay Symphony Orchestra.
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It's a very musical piece (I know it sounds strange, but if I may say so nowadays many new pieces just aren't really focused on the music). I feel that music is about communication (and so are relationships), and I've always wanted my music to connect to the audience. I hope this piece will connect to all of you.


Thank you and I look forward to meeting you!

Warm Regards,

Zhou

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